What You Never Suspected About Water in the Atmosphere

Are you aware of the H2O molecules structural capabilities in the atmosphere?

Have you ever wondered about the molecular dynamics of what is really going on in the cone or vortex of a tornado?

On a molecular level water is very aggressive about getting together with other water molecules to become decidedly unaggressive. We mostly notice the result of the water molecule’s aggression, its complete lack of aggression, and we are, therefore, mostly unaware of how incredibly aggressive it, the H2O molecule, can be to become unaggressive. More specifically, the H2O molecule’s aggression is a result of its inherit polarity and the electromagnet implications thereof: as water, on the molecular level, aggressively seeks out connections with other water molecules, The strength and persistence of these forces cause it to collectively (in the form of liquid water) to become more interconnected molecularly, more entangled, denser. And that’s where things get strange. Because the more entangled and denser it (water) becomes (the more bonds are achieved between molecules of H2O) the more the forces that caused it to become entangled are neutralized, turned off, resulting in the high fluidity (low viscosity) of water. In a sense, H2O molecules are in a great big hurry to surround themselves with other H2O molecules (by way of hydrogen bond connections at all four locations of their structure) so that they can treat other H2O molecules with (almost) complete indifference.

The mechanism that underlies this strange passive-aggressive behavior of the water molecule—this individual tendency to aggressively seek to become collectively unaggressive—might best be understood with respect to the fact that the bond that takes place between water molecules is a hydrogen bond. Unlike covalent bonds, water’s hydrogen bond is the result of (a function of) the polarity of the two H2O molecules that are participants in the bond. However, and in complete contrast to a covalent bond, when a hydrogen bond is achieved a fraction of the polarity is neutralized, turned off, in both of the two H2O molecules that participate in the hydrogen bond. So, ironically, the achievement of a hydrogen bond (and each H2O molecule can participate in up to four bonds, each with a different H2O molecule) is at one and the same time the result of the water molecule’s polarity and the (partial) neutralization thereof.

This tendency to become entangled, to aggressively fold in on itself, and to, thereby, neutralize its polarity as it becomes entangled is so effective and so instantaneous (and happening on such a such a microscopic scale) that we are mostly unaware of the H2O molecule’s underlying ability to produce some fairly significant electromagnetic forces (surface tension) and bond strength (tensile strength). (Note: liquid water’s hydrogen bond offer’s no compressive strength whatsoever.) All in all, what it really comes down to is this: H2O molecules are so effective at getting together with other H2O molecules and neutralizing the polarity that brought them together, we (us humans) generally are unaware of the possibility that if a mechanism can be theorized (or experimentally revealed) that will defeat the H2O molecule’s aggressive and insidious tendency to collectively fold in on itself and, thereby, neutralize its polarity, then these structural capabilities can emerge (there are two: [a.] bond strength [tensile strength only] and [b.] surface tension).

In a sense H2O is like a superhero. It’s superpowers are concealed from us by its ability to blend in with a crowd of other depolarized, mild mannered H2O molecules. Its true strength is only revealed when events tear it away from the crowd. Only when alone, when individual water molecules are detached (or relatively detached [this is important]) from other water molecules do water’s superpowers emerge.

Have you every wondered why it is that tornadoes are associated with wind shear in which one of the bodies of air is moist and the other is dry? Well, wonder no more. That mystery is solved. Follow the link on this blog to my book entitled, Vortex Phase: The Discovery of the Spin That Underlies the Twist. http://wp.me/p4JijN-aE

6 responses to “What You Never Suspected About Water in the Atmosphere”

  1. Johannes says :

    Something that’s not been addressed in this discussion: Thunderstorm updrafts are positively buoyant because of their *temperature* excess relative to the surrounding air, not because of their moisture excess. As condensation occurs in a storm’s updraft, the cloud droplets (and further up in the updraft, rain, snow, graupel, hail,…) act to slow down the updraft anyway (compared to a scenario where moisture was zero). But despite all these hydrometeors (cloud droplets, rain, etc.), the updraft remains positively buoyant because of its temperature excess. This implies that even if the claim was correct that moist air is heavier than dry air, this wouldn’t change any of the textbook explanations of convective updrafts, which again are based on the temperature excess of the updraft. Moreover, the presumed moist-air-being-heavier-than-dry-air effect would likely be overwhelmed by the hydrometeor load. (However, there is no support for the claim that unsaturated moist air is heavier than dry air — perhaps you are considering a scenario in which condensation occurs, where larger clusters of H2O molecules can persist; in this case the moist air sample, now containing tiny droplets, indeed becomes heavier than its dry counterpart, but this effect is well accounted for in quantitative descriptions of convective storms.)

    • solvingtornadoes says :

      Johannes says : July 30, 2014 at 12:18 pm
      Thunderstorm updrafts are positively buoyant because of warm air convection (not moist air convection).

      Jim McGinn:
      Thanks for the interest Johannes,
      I don’t think there is enough buoyancy associated with warmer air to overcome the extra weight that results from the clumping of water clusters. The only time we see warm air convection is in desert environments where the air is very dry: dust devils. Dust devils are very benign. And there’s no structure, no tubular cone or vortex (no conduit for energy transfer, see below), as can be clearly seen in many tornadoes.

      IMO, the energy of thunderstorms and tornadoes is delivered from above through invisible conduits that are tributaries of the jet stream, all of which (JS, tributaries, and vortices of tornadoes) are an implication of the structural capabilities of atmospheric H2O, as indicated in the post of this thread.

      Johannes:
      However, there is no support for the claim that unsaturated moist air is heavier than dry air

      Jim McGinn:
      I believe there is support for the claim, albeit indirect. For more on this follow this link: http://wp.me/p4JijN-3X Start reading where it mentions, “history of the steam engine.” I argue that this is hard evidence that demonstrates H2Os tendency to clump up at ambient temperatures. In the context of Avogadro’s Law this would prove it must be heavier. Beyond that I also would mention that there is no dispute for the claim that unsaturated moist air is heavier than dry air.

      Johannes:
      . . . this effect is well accounted for in quantitative descriptions of convective storms.

      Jim McGinn:
      Not much of anything is well accounted for in “quantitative descriptions of convective storms,” in my estimation. It’s about as vague as vague can be. And most of the math is there to create the illusion of sophistication and conciseness when in reality none of it is measurable, testable.

    • solvingtornadoes says :

      Something that’s not been addressed in this discussion: Thunderstorm updrafts are positively buoyant because of their *temperature* excess relative to the surrounding air, not because of their moisture excess.

      Solvingtornadoes:
      People that make these claims never back them up with anything substantive.

      As condensation occurs in a storm’s updraft, the cloud droplets (and further up in the updraft, rain, snow, graupel, hail,…) act to slow down the updraft anyway (compared to a scenario where moisture was zero). But despite all these hydrometeors (cloud droplets, rain, etc.), the updraft remains positively buoyant because of its temperature excess.

      Solvingtornadoes:
      These are silly claims in that condensation heating is hocus pocus nonsense. People have been, off-handedly, making these kinds of vague claims for years now. They never provide details. And when they do one soon realizes that they almost always make the erroneous assumptions that condensation in atmosphere is the result of steam–which is impossible. So this is an argument for fools.

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