A Simple Experiment That Meteorologists Refuse To Do

There is a simple experiment that will revolutionize our understanding of atmospheric processes, and meteorologists refuse to do it. The experiment is simply a measurement of the weight of moist air compared to the weight of dry air, all other factor being controlled. But it doesn’t matter since meteorologists won’t do the experiment.  The experiment is simple.  It woudn’t cost more than $200.  Yet they won’t do the experiment.

Why won’t they do the experiment?  Because the results will show that moist air is heavier than dry air.  That would mean moist-air convection is impossible.  And they choose to believe in moist-air convection.  Consequently they ignore all evidence that doesn’t fit with what they choose to believe.

And these are the people we’ve entrusted to study severe weather?

9 responses to “A Simple Experiment That Meteorologists Refuse To Do”

  1. solvingtornadoes says :

    This is an issue Meteorology has sidestepped for 170 years. There is no reason to not suspect they will continue to do the same.

  2. Truthseeker says :

    Can you explain your statement “moist air convection is impossible”?

    There is an easier way to do your weight experiment. Go to a sea-level desert and breathe for a while. Now go to a sea-level jungle and breathe for a while. Which takes more effort? Now ask yourself why …

    • solvingtornadoes says :

      Well, it has to do with the fact that the existence of cold steam is just an urban myth. Beyond that I’d just suggest reading my site more comprehensively.

      I’m not understanding what your point is with desert, jungle.

      • Truthseeker says :

        I get that steam (monomolecular water as a gas) can only exist above the boling point of water. Doesn’t that boling point change at different pressures? My high-school chemistry was a long time ago.

        I have spent time in both very humid environments and very arid ones. I have noticed that breathing in the more humid environment takes more effort, that is the air is “heavier”. Anecdotal I know, but your point about the weight of moist air seems obvious to me.

        I have read your posts and I like the content. I am still not making the connection between the falicy of cold steam, the weight of moist air and why convection would be impossible.

        • solvingtornadoes says :

          Truthseeker:
          “I get that steam (monomolecular water as a gas) can only exist above the boiling point of water.”

          Jim McGinn:
          Do you realize that puts you, along with myself and a few others (Al Shelton), at odds with every meteorologist on this planet: http://wp.me/p4JijN-21

          Truthseeker:
          “Doesn’t that boiling point change at different pressures?”

          Jim McGinn:
          Sure. If you think it matters to anything you should make an argument to that effect.
          http://wp.me/p4JijN-7p

          Truthseeker:
          . . . your point about the weight of moist air seems obvious to me.
          I am still not making the connection between the fallacy of cold steam, the weight of moist air and why convection would be impossible.

          Jim McGinn:
          Maybe this will help: http://goo.gl/OPWLYr

          • Truthseeker says :

            The universe only works one way. It certainly does not care what anyone thinks and it certainly is unconcerned with the popularity of any particular theory. The universe is not a democracry.

            I really do not care who agrees or disagrees with me. I only concern myself with what can be observed and what actually works. I am not an engineer, but I take an engineer’s view of science :-

            If you cannot use it to build something that works in the real world, it is speculation.

            The point about pressure affecting the boling point of water is that steam may exist at colder temperatures if the pressure is low enough. For the bulk of the atmosphere that may not be significant, but does it make any real difference to the upper parts of the atmosphere?

            The last link did not work for me.

          • solvingtornadoes says :

            Truthseeker:
            I take an engineer’s view of science :-

            Jim McGinn: Me too.

            Truthseeker:
            If you cannot use it to build something that works in the real world, it is speculation.

            The point about pressure affecting the boiling point of water is that steam may exist at colder temperatures if the pressure is low enough.

            Jim McGinn:
            Isn’t this common knowledge?

            Truthseeker:
            For the bulk of the atmosphere that may not be significant, but does it make any real difference to the upper parts of the atmosphere?

            Jim McGinn: Did you read the link? Jay Charney couldn’t find any relevance. And, apparently, you can’t either. Right? So what does that tell you/us?

            Truthseeker:
            The last link did not work for me.

            Jim McGinn: Try this.
            https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topicsearchin/sci.physics/%22cold$20steam%22$20AND$20buoyancy$20AND$20-cotton

  3. Truthseeker says :

    I am going to start again because I clearly am not making myself clear in terms of the question I am trying to ask.

    Assuming you are correct about moist air being heaver that dry air (which I agree with) then I do not see how the conclusion “That would mean moist-air convection is impossible.” follows from that premise.

    Convection is the transfer of energy by the movement of molecules. I do not see how just because the water is multimolecular vapor rather than monomolecular steam that such movement suddenly becomes impossible in a free flowing atmosphere.

    • solvingtornadoes says :

      Buoyancy (ie. Archimedes) as in hot air balloons and blimps. Do research on the term in the context of meteorology.

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